We Own A Horse!

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McDove scored her second career win February 2 at Golden Gate Fields

We are excited to announce that the Emerald Racing Club has acquired its first horse for the 2017 racing season at Emerald Downs.

McDove, a 4-year-old Kentucky-bred filly by Proud Citizen, has been sold privately to Emerald Racing Club by Steve McDonald of Surrey, B.C. The purchase price is $10,000 and the filly will remain with trainers Larry and Sharon Ross.

In February, McDove scored a four-length victory in a $12,500 claiming race for non-winner of two races lifetime at Golden Gate Fields. She most recently finished fourth in a $40,000 starter allowance race, and should arrive at Emerald Downs fit and ready to race. Since we purchased her privately, there is no 45-day “jail” time that comes with claiming a horse in California.

Even better yet, McDove won’t be changing barns! She remains with the Ross’, an important consideration since they are familiar with the ins and outs of the horse both mentally and physically. Call me biased, but experience tells me this filly should fit nicely at Emerald Downs.

McDove will van to Emerald Downs later this week and we’ll able to meet her at the barn very soon. She will need to get acclimated to new surroundings, of course, and then Sharon will let us know a daily routine for gallops, workouts, etc. For those of you familiar with the layout, the tentative plan is to stable her next to 2016 Emerald Racing Club runner Archie Graham.

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McDove in her stall at Golden Gate

Prior to joining Larry Ross at Golden Gate last fall, McDove campaigned at Hastings Racecourse in Vancouver, winning one of six starts including her career debut in a maiden special weight race on August 31, 2015. Her overall record in 10 starts is two wins, one second and one third with earnings of $27,558.

McDonald paid $40,000 for McDove at the 2014 Keeneland September Sale. Her sire was runner-up in the 2002 Kentucky Derby and her dam, Dove Cry, has produced seven winning foals including stakes winner Sleeping Indian and $170,000 earner Don’t Shoot. So on behalf of Emerald Racing Club, I wish to publicly thank Mr. McDonald  for offering us McDove at a very square price.

McDove seems to be most effective in routes (races one mile or longer) including the four-length victory in the one-mile race in February, but she did break her maiden in a six-furlong race and there are far more short races than long ones in the early season at Emerald Downs. So her versatility is a big plus.

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McDove is a 4-year-old bay filly

If all goes well, we could add a second horse very soon. As for McDove, we’ll take plenty more pictures when she gets here and let everyone know when they can see her on the track and at the barn.

What a great turnout this morning at Emerald Downs!

Unofficially I counted 48 Emerald Racing Club members enjoying some rare sunshine and the hustle and bustle of the racetrack, and coffee and goodies at the Quarter Chute Cafe.

We let Sharon Ross break the news about McDove which drew a big cheer, and back at the barn she went over some rules and regulations and showed us the stall that is likely to house McDove.

We’ll do it all again next Sunday (March 26) at 9 a.m. Hope you can make it!

Incidentally, we still have a few spots remaining in this year’s Club. So if you know anybody interested, tell ’em we still have room!

2017 Emerald Racing Club Registration

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7 thoughts on “We Own A Horse!

    • Hi Kim, McDove has done some nice things in her career, hopefully the best is yet to come. I will get an update Thursday on when the horse will arrive from California.

  1. Is there a reason there was no discussion or mentioning about what horse(s) were being considered prior. This seems like a huge decision and yet as a “part owner” I feel a bit left out. Even just a notification of what horses were being considered and why would have been welcomed.

    I thought the club goals were stated to be “All aspects of racehorse ownership will be explained from acquiring a horse…..”. Yet there was no explanation or discussion or information about the process and how this particular horse was chosen. Or even what ones were being considered (if any others).

    I am a bit confused as to the goals in the club agreement / statement and how they are reached. It is different than I imagined when reading the membership agreement and joining. It stated all aspects would be explained but this critical part, the purchasing decision, was just done and announced without any explanation of who, why, how, etc.

    I assume Larry Ross trains in CA too since the horse is from CA and you said the horse was staying with them as trainer. So this horse was bought with them being the trainer(s) prior to buying? I’m not sure I understand because it didn’t really say. The whole length post doesn’t address any of that (or I missed it?).

    Were there any other horses considered? Or only horses that the Ross’s currently train? Who ultimately has the decision-making authority for purchasing? The trainer?

    Just trying to understand the process here because it (the purchase) seemed to just happen with no prior mention. While I realize that it would be difficult to solicit up to 200 people I would think that some sort of info on horses being considered and their affiliations might have been shared with those that put up the $100,000 total membership fees?

    Thanks in advance for your reply. I look forward to understanding the process here.

    • My experience has been that per our club agreement, our trainers have carte blanche. Especially when it comes to which horses to purchase and what races to run in. This seems to be the case with any larger ownership group.
      This type of thing like how they choose which horses to purchase are much easier to explain after the fact. I’d assume that exactly that will happen at the club orientation, that they will explain how and why we ended up with the horse’s we did but in short…..having our trainers know the ins and outs of these horses and that there aren’t any hidden severe health issues and they were affordable and are thought to be able to compete at the 10k to 15k level at Emerald are all reasons that would have factored into the decision to run with Mcdove and Distinguishable. Anyway as a member for the last few years I hope I was able to help a little bit and welcome to the Club.

  2. My experience has been that per our club agreement, our trainers have carte blanche. Especially when it comes to which horses to purchase and what races to run in. This seems to be the case with any larger ownership group.
    This type of thing like how they choose which horses to purchase are much easier to explain after the fact. I’d assume that exactly that will happen at the club orientation, that they will explain how and why we ended up with the horse’s we did but in short…..having our trainers know the ins and outs of these horses and that there aren’t any hidden severe health issues and they were affordable and are thought to be able to compete at the 10k to 15k level at Emerald are all reasons that would have factored into the decision to run with Mcdove and Distinguishable. Anyway as a member for the last few years I hope I was able to help a little bit and welcome to the Club.

  3. Thanks for your input Shane. Communication among the members is always a good thing. From what I gather the only method other than in person at a meeting is this blog comments section.

    I am not used to this style (multiple owners in this large number) of ownership but didn’t think it would be all that much different. I have owned a few 2 year olds in the past and mainly when I was an employee at the Longacres track in Renton. So while horse race ownership isn’t new to me the idea of having 200 owners definitely is. I joined out of curiosity more than anything.

    It seemed a surprise to have a horse (actually two) purchased without any prior mentioning or communication on what horses were being considered. Or, were there other horses being considered and if not why not? Were the only horses being considered those that have a prior relation with the trainer(s).

    I say plural because it sounds like Mike is now also a trainer for the group and the 2nd horse was bought from where he works, hence the relationship appearance of how these were chosen. The blog isn’t very clear in those areas (Ross’s vs Mike’s role/s). I would not think that two separate trainers and businesses could have carte blanche but perhaps that is the case? Hence my question/s – wanting to understand the relationships of the people (trainers), expenditures, and major decision making (not day-to-day of course) and those of us here, the 200, that put up the operating capital.

    While I understand a carte blanch on day-to-day as mentioned in the agreement I didn’t think it extended as far as one of the most critical decisions (horse purchase). So I was surprised at the total lack of transparency on what ones were being considered and then ultimately purchased. Some mention of which horses were in the running would have seemed appropriate IMO.

    Perhaps Vince can elaborate on what all horses were considered and why the 198 members were let in on any of the process that took place.

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